Zero Week Scrimmage

Participating in this zero week scrimmage was extremely helpful to Ozone! The team was able to practice for 2 hours and recognize and fix a number of issues that would otherwise have gone unnoticed until competition. All members of the drive team were able to practice collecting and dropping off gears, collecting balls, shooting balls, and climbing the rope. Thank you to the PAST innovation lab for letting us use their space today.

Before practicing on the field, 2 members of the programming team tested each mechanism and fixed any speed or direction issues involved with them. After doing a few practice rounds, the fabrication team added cardboard to the sides of the shooter to keep overflowing balls from the hopper out of it. Electrical wise, we noticed at the end of the scrimmage that a battery was getting hot and therefore had bad electrical connections that were redone in the shop afterwards.

After the scrimmage, the attending team members met to discuss good things about our robot and also things we need to work on. Drive team wise, they need to standardize hand signals and make sure everyone that goes to competition is aware of them, in case a driver is sick or injured. The airships limit visibility of the loading station so our human players will need to communicate to the individuals in the driver’s station what way they need to move in order to catch a gear. We would also like to have a ‘pre-flight’ checklist at competition before we queue up for matches. For example, the team will check if the battery is at full power, if the roboRIO is working correctly, etc. We also will need to talk to the judges about certain rules regarding the rope. If another robot touches us while we are in contact with the rope, we automatically get the points as if we climbed the rope. If someone bumps into us, we could use this to our advantage and try to get more points by shooting high goals or getting gears. Before we even go to competition though, the drive team will need to invest time into practicing the timing in which they open the gear grabber and back away from the peg. They also will need to practice turning the quickest way possible. Currently, the drivers can get gears and climb the rope in an efficient manner.

A lot of work in these last few days before stop build day rests on the programming team. They will work with the other teams within Ozone to mount cameras onto the competition robot: one for visual acquisition, and one to communicate with the drivers station so drivers can line themselves up quickly to collect and drop off gears. We will also have ultrasonic sensors on the final robot to help us shoot straight; inconsistent shooting was a problem we encountered at the scrimmage. Coders will be adding a filter to set the speed of all mechanisms on the robot, while still allowing an override to push any mechanism up to 100% power. The placement, color and programming of the LED lights was also discussed at the after-scrimmage meeting. They will help to communicate to the drivers how far away they are from field apparatuses but we need to also make sure that they don’t interfere with the visual acquisition light.

At today’s all member meeting. LED lights were wired in preparation for mounting them onto the competition robot. Programmers worked on perfecting autonomous code in conjunction with visual acquisition. The design team worked on redesigning the drive station. Fabricators constructed more bumpers and fixed broken parts on the mecanum robot.

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